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The Proactive Twelve Steps (printable)


This is the 3rd edition of the Proactive 12 Steps. Also available as a printable PDF file.



Click on "commentary" under each step for detailed discussion of the step.



Step 1:

I realize that willpower has not worked to stop my dysfunctional behaviors... and continuing to do what does not work is the definition of insanity.

Original wording (AA):
We admitted we were powerless over alcohol--that our lives had become unmanageable.

commentary



Step 2:

Willpower does not work because my dysfunctional behaviors come from fear and pressure. I need safety and support to overcome that.

Original wording (AA):
Came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

commentary



Step 3:

I don't have to live in fear and shame. I will strive to find safety and support in connection rather than isolation.

Original wording (AA):
Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

commentary



Step 4:

I resolve to systematically face my fears in order to remove what is in the way of my finding safety, support and trust in life.

Original wording (AA):
Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

commentary



Step 5:

As I gain a compassionate understanding of my actions, I am better able to take responsibility for them.

Original wording (AA):
Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

commentary



Step 6:

I no longer identify with my knee-jerk reactions, because I know they're based in fear, not a deep sense of who I am and what I want.

Original wording (AA):
Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

commentary



Step 7:

Moment by moment, I strive to find my motivation in a deeper sense of who I really am, rather than fear and defensiveness.

Original wording (AA):
Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

commentary



Step 8:

I stop blaming and feeling blamed, with a willingness to heal the wounds.

Original wording (AA):
Made a list of all the people we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

commentary



Step 9:

I swallow my pride, and sincerely apologize to people I've hurt, except when this would be counterproductive.

Original wording (AA):
Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

commentary



Step 10:

I live mindfully, paying attention to the motives and effects of my actions.

Original wording (AA):
Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

commentary



Step 11:

I stay in touch with a broader sense of who I really am, and a deeper sense of what I really want.

Original wording (AA):
Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

commentary



Step 12:

A growing sense of wholeness and contentment motivates me to keep at it, and to share this process with others who are struggling.

Original wording (AA):
Having had a spiritual awakening as a result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

commentary



Printable PDF file

Related: About higher power | serenity (full text)



See also:
- More info related to The Proactive 12 Steps
- Get the free e-book: Proactive 12 Steps for Mindful Recovery
- Proactive 12 Steps on facebook



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